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Knowing When To Buy Your Next Apple Gadget


So you just bought an iPad? Congratulations! Yet, the next thing you hear in the news is that you shiny new toy is now being replaced by a brand new edition. What do you do now or better yet, how can you prevent this from happening again?  Such is the quandary of any gadget user, whether you're early adopter or a "wait until it's tested and thoroughly reviewed" buyer. Technology evolves and companies looking to stay ahead and sell devices need to keep their product line fresh.

Apple is no stranger to this phenomenon, and many will argue that it is now a leader of change in the music, computer, and recently, tablet markets. Unless you're following techies and companies regularly like we do, it can be quite the challenge to know when to spend your hard-earned money on a new iPod, iPad or iMac.

Thankfully, there is a method to Apple's madness and one of the best places to track product release patterns is through the buyer's guide offered at macrumors.com. Here, you're able to quickly glance at and compare previous release dates, days since the last update, and the guide's recommendation based on these data. Each product recommendation also comes with recent rumors concerning any pending developments.

There is even relief for those who just purchased the soon-to-be-outdated first generation iPad. Apple is offering a $100 refund if you purchased the tablet in store or online within the past two weeks. The is consistent with its 14-day return policy anyway, but a price adjustment usually is not advertised as an option. Alternatively, you can inquire about price match and/or return policies if you chose to make your purchase at a big box store such as Best Buy or Walmart.
Once you've played the gadget purchasing game a few times, you come to terms with the fact that any technology device you buy today will inevitably be outdated tomorrow. Thus, it's often best to just close your eyes and ears to the gadget news and blog feeds and simply appreciate what you already have.

Photo Source: apple.com

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