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Sunday, June 26, 2011

8 easy tips to avoid cellphone radiation


If you are worried about recent revelations about cell phone radiation by the WHO, do not despair. There are a number of ways in which you can safeguard yourself to to a large extent.
 
According to well-known American non-government organization Environmental Working Group, or EWS, cellphone users can follow these tips to reduce the risk of exposure to cancerous electro-magnetic rays that cellphones may be emitting.

Buy a low-radiation phone 
Always try to look up buyers' guide or Internet, or seek experts' advise to know about the radiation levels of your phone, or the model you intend to buy.
Most phones' model numbers are printed under the battery. Consider replacing your phone with one that emits the lowest radiation possible and still meets your communication needs.

4 money-saving smartphone apps
 Headsets - whether Bluetooth or wired - emit much less radiation than phones. Choose either wired or wireless according to convenience and your needs.
However, it is not advisable to continuously wear the headsets above the ears as most Bluetooth headsets emit continuous, low-level radiation. So take it off your ear when you're not on a call. Using your phone in speaker mode also minimises radiation to the head.

Poor signal? Stay away from phoneFewer signal bars on your phone means that it emits much higher radiation to get the signal to the tower. Make and take calls when your phone has a strong signal, instead of incessantly using it and cursing your mobile operator.
Remember, it is your brain that will be getting fried due to poor signal!

Skip the radiation shield 
Radiation shields such as antenna caps or keypad covers reduce the connection quality and force the phone to transmit at a much higher power with higher radiation. So while they may be protecting your phone, it is at the cost of your own health.

Limit children's phone use 
Young children's brains absorb twice as much cell phone radiation as those of adults. Along with health agencies in at least 6 countries, EWG has recommended parents to set up limits for children's cell phone use, such as for emergency situations only.
They may be encouraged to either make short, sweet conversations, or use the good, old landline phones.
 
Listen more, talk less 
Cellphones emit maximum radiation when you talk or text, but not when you're receiving messages or listening. Hence, the age-old saying of listening more and talking less can come in handy here in reducing your exposure level.
 
Hold phone away from body
 Hold the phone away from your torso when you're talking (with headset or speaker), not against your ear, in a pocket, or on your belt where soft body tissues continuously absorb radiation.
Even while sleeping, avoid keeping it under the pillow or next to you. It should ideally be kept a few feet away even if you want to keep it handy just in case the President or the Prime Minister decide to call upon you in the dead of night.

Choose texting over talking 
Phones use less power (and hence less radiation) to send out text than voice communication. And unlike when you speak with the phone placed next to your ear, texting keeps radiation away from your head.
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Monday, June 20, 2011

Sakshat Tablet to be Launched in June 2011


Remember the Rs. 1500 Indian laptop? The one that got the world making fun of India in general and me never having faith in Kapil Sibal again?
The one that actually turned out to be an expensive storage device, and then somehow metamorphosed into a tablet?
It's being announced that the "Sakshat" (which sounds conspicuously dirty in Americanese), the $35 tablet codenamed 'Sakshat' is expected to launch by the end of this month.
While the Indian media is huffing up the desi-pride angle with talks of "Indian-iPad". there's very little for a complete tablet experience. And there's nothing desi about it; the tablet is made by Canadian firm Datawind Ltd.
The7-inch touchscreen tablet features a inbuilt keyboard, video conferencing facility, multimedia content, Wi-Fi, USB port, 32GB hard drive and a 2GB RAM. There's support for Open Office, SciLab and Internet browsing.

However, this means nothing for the aam-aadmi it was intended for, but there is a desi crop of real tablets worth checking out.

10,000 Sakshat tablets will be shipped to IIT Rajasthan by June-end, following by the launch of over 90,000 tablet units in the next 4 months.

Sakshat: Other Specifications

QWERTY keyboard, mouse and a minimum display of 7” colour LCD/TFT (touchscreen optional)
2 USB 2.0 ports and USB hosts
three hours
batteryless device
SD card slot (8GB expandable memory)
Support to connect LCD projector
Support for external hard disk drive (Minimum 32 GB)
Ethernet port
WLAN
80% shock resistant
While the tablets will be priced at Rs 2,200, there are reports of plans for later subsidies of 50%. The 1500 Rupee tablet might go for Rs. 1100, and has been developed as a part of the National Mission on Education through Information and Communication Technology to bring together 25,000 colleges and 400 universities in the Asian subcontinent in an e-learning initiative. (MensXP.com)

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Thursday, June 16, 2011

One In Every Four Indian Online Users Victims Of Cyber Attacks: Microsoft

Cyber-crime is a growing concern for Indian online users since nearly one in every four Indian online user has been a victim of cyber-attacks, out of which 67 per cent suffered personal data loss followed by 19 per cent users witnessing email account hacking.

Additionally Indian online users spend more time worrying about the safety of their social networking accounts rather than the loss of personal data and credit card fraud. While 74 per cent worry about potential hacking of their social networking account, only 16 per cent worry about loss of personal data and a mere 5 per cent are concerned about credit card fraud, according to an online usage and security survey conducted by Microsoft Corporation India Pvt. Ltd.

Pankaj Ukey, Director – Windows Client, Consumer and Online Business, Microsoft India said “Consumers are becoming increasingly aware about security threats they are exposed to in the online environment and are looking for security solutions that work in the back-end and let them enjoy their online world without any worries or interruptions.”

The survey was hosted on Microsoft India’s ‘Windows and Me’ Facebook page and received responses from over thousand 1000 users. The survey further stated that 50 per cent of Indians online spend close to five hours on the internet on a daily basis, out of which 40 per cent people spend this time on social networking sites, 35 per cent spend their time on research and 22 per cent spend it on entertainment. The survey also reveals that almost 90 per cent Indians have an anti-virus installed on their personal computer.
“Today consumers are opting for free, subscription based model for anti-virus solutions. Realizing this need we offer the Microsoft Security Essentials, which is a convenient security solution.” said Pankaj.
The survey also revealed that close to 60 per cent Indians prefer free, subscription model while 11 per cent go for free anti-virus download. The popular anti-virus in the market includes Kaspersky, Norton, Avast, AVG, McAfee and Panda anti-virus.

The results of the survey have also raised a few concerns. Has the Indian online user lost focus of his priorities, since if a user’s social networking account is hacked the user can get the account blocked and then generate a fresh password from the networking sites, but on the other hand, if personal data or credit card details are hacked, the users can become victims of identity theft or end up losing large sums of money.
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Wednesday, June 15, 2011

10 biggest technology myths

By Mumbai Mirror,



Ah, the world of tech myths! Despite countless efforts to kill them, a host of myths continue to persist. Some of them are result of plain ignorance while a few had genuine lineage but as the technology moves forward, do not hold true anymore.


More mega pixels mean better pictures

We wish it could be true. Because then we all would have been pro photographers. More mega pixels were a big deal when digital cameras were new. But once the threshold of five mega pixels was reached, the number stopped being the most important factor in a camera.



In any modern camera, image quality primarily depends on sensor size and quality of lens. This is the reason why you are likely to get better images from say a Nikon D40, a 6 mega pixel camera, than a new point-and-shoot slick camera that can capture photos in 14 mega pixels.



Higher dynamic contrast ratio is better

Monitor and TV makers love to bandy about dynamic contrast ration. For example, Acer says its S231HL monitor has a dynamic contrast ratio of 12,000,000:1. In reality, this number doesn’t mean anything.



This contrast ratio can be achieved only when the monitor is displaying a completely black image. During normal use, the ratio is likely to be lot less than the static contrast ratio, which is 1000:1. Dynamic contrast ratio is a just a marketing scam so steer clear of that.



More RAM in a graphics card is better

This is another marketing scam. And many gamers fall prey to it. In a graphics card, everything depends on the kind of processing chip that is used and not on amount of RAM. While buying a graphics card users need to pay close attention to the name. For example, AMD Radeon HD 6850 with just 1GB RAM will be more than four to five times faster than AMD Radeon 6450 with 2GB RAM.



Macs don't have viruses

It’s not really a myth. There is some truth to it. People using Apple’s MacBook, iMac or Mac Pro are less likely to face computer viruses. But this is not because Apple’s computers or operating software are virus-proof. The fact is that cyber criminals largely focus on Windows because that is used by majority of people. But as popularity of Apple’s computers increases, cyber criminals are taking note and new viruses and trojans on Mac have started appearing.



Right click+refresh makes PC faster

Around 15 years ago, computers were always running out of memory. RAM was very expensive and most computers had just 4MB to 8MB RAM. Then, there were poorly-coded applications that caused memory leaks. This led to the practice of right click+refresh on the desktop as by refreshing the display or in other words Explorer, in some cases users quickly reclaimed free RAM after closing a process.



On modern computers, which have ample RAM, doing a right click+refresh is nothing more than a foolish habit.



For graphics work, a Mac is best

This one too was true sometime back. But now it’s more of a myth than a fact. Before 2006, Apple was using processors based on PowerPC architecture by IBM. Compared to Intel or AMD processors, PowerPC chips had an advantage in graphics-heavy work. But after 2006, Apple shifted to Intel processors. A Mac still has some advantage in font management as well as quality of bundled monitor. But if you are a graphic designer who knows your trade well and who takes care while choosing his gear, you don’t need to pay premium and buy a Mac just because someone told you that it is better for



To delete a file permanently, delete it from Recycle Bin

After deleting a sensitive file from recycle bin, never think that you have obliterated it. Using recovery programmes, even a kid can retrieve the file back. When you delete a file from recycle bin, Windows just changes its file name and makes it invisible to user. The file does not get deleted unless it is overwritten, which happens over a period of time when you create new files.



CPUs with more cores/Ghz are better

Another marketing lie. In any processor or computing chip, the underlying architecture is what matters. This is the reason why even slower AMD Athlon processors were considerably faster than Pentium 4. And the architecture is reason why nowadays a four-core Sandy Bridge processor from Intel is faster than six-core processors that AMD sells.



You need to buy expensive security software

This was true when no good security software were available for free. But situation has changed a lot in the last few years. Nowadays, if you want some cyber security on a home computer you don’t really need to spend any money.



Microsoft Security Essentials, which is a free dowanload, will do the job. And so will free anti-virus programs from AVG, Avast or Avira.



You need to stop a USB drive before taking it out

This is true but partially. If there is a file transfer going on, which means if you are moving files between pen drive and computer, you may need to stop USB drive before unplugging the pen drive.



But if there is no file transfer happening, you can pluck out the pen drive right away. We assure you that it won’t go up in flames.


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