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Monday, March 17, 2014

iPhone users are disappointed with the iOS 7.1 software update that's draining their batteries, erasing their contacts, and flipping their keyboards

The iOS 7.1 is already on 21 per cent of all iPhones and iPads making it one of the fastest changeovers to a new operating system in recent history
·  Customers say it's killing their batteries among other glitches

With every new I-phone software update comes the potential for problems and the iOS 7.1 released on Monday is no exception.  
Customer's say it's killing their phone batteries among other pesky glitches.
The iOS7.1 is the first major update to Apple's newest operating systems for iPhones and iPads and the apple community is lamenting poor battery charges, disappearing contacts, bad Bluetooth connections, keyboards oriented the wrong way, and the list goes on, reports the Huffington Post.

According to zdnet.com, the iOS 7.1 is already on 21 per cent of all iPhones and iPads making it one of the fastest changeovers to a new operating system in recent history.
Despite rigorous internal testing and five beta versions offered to Apple developers, the battery seems to drop much faster than it did on the iOS7.
A twitter page dedicated to problems with the iOS7.1 has a collection of comments on the faults with the new update.
'iPhone has been unplugged 30 mins and already down to 92% battery' tweeted @Robbie Kimpton.
'I think I'd have to get that juice pack that gives me double battery life,' tweeted Timothy Tung Nguyen.

'Not knowing who you're texting,' tweeted @DanHallas
Users also took to Apple's discussion forum to voice their issues with the supposedly newer and better program.

I've had my phone for 3 months, never have dropped it once or anything of the sort, if that matters. My battery drains to 50% within an hour or so after intense use on the lowest level of brightness, and I seem to lose about 5-7 percents when on standby for 5 hours or so,' said rainxwater.
'My iphone 5s battery also drains fast after ios 7.1 update. Before the update I get 24hrs moderate to heavy use. But now I only get 12 hours'.

My iPhone 5S has been draining like crazy since the iOS 7.1 Update. This morning I woke up at 8:30, my phone was at 100%. It's now 10:40 and my phone is at 85%,' said Mattyboy.
Customers now wait to see if Apple  will take charge over the system's battery problems.


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Wednesday, March 12, 2014

BIG secret of WhatsApp...

As BlackBerry gets set to take its native BBM instant messaging service cross-platform to Android and iOS, there's no doubt the incumbent it wants to crush is WhatsApp. Over the last couple of years WhatsApp has grown to have a huge base of users across platforms and around the world. Jump into any phone app store, and WhatsApp will always be near the top of the list. 

WhatsApp has been successful because it gained critical mass in filling a void that BBM could have and arguably should have done years ago. Anybody who's used BBM and watched the rise of WhatsApp knows WhatsApp essentially ripped off BBM in form and function, and has been playing catch up to BBM on a feature by feature basis. Most people I know don't love WhatsApp - they simply tolerate it, as it gets the job done well enough for the most part. The thing is, it really doesn't.

One critical feature that WhatsApp is sorely missing that a lot of users simply do not realize is a notification that your message has been read by the recipient. On BBM and iMessage for that matter, D and R are used as notifications to the sender. The D represents that the message has been delivered to the phone. The R represents that the message has been read by the recipient. The value of the R is super critical, as it's what keeps you in the loop on the status of your conversation and that it's happening in real time.

Instead of a D and R, WhatsApp uses checkmarks to represent message status. Based on the precedent set by BBM and WhatsApp, I think a LOT of WhatsApp users out there mistakenly take this to mean that one checkmark means the message has reached the phone while the second checkmark means the message has been read. I have seen this happen in my life often - where people think I've read their WhatsApp message and ignored them in replying because they see two checkmarks on their end, yet in reality I haven't even read the message on my phone. This is often referred to as the "dirty R" when it comes to BBM, but the concept of the dirty R doesn't exist on WhatsApp as there is no read confirmation.
As stated in WhatsApps' official FAQ:

http://crackberry.com/sites/crackberry.com/files/article_images/2013/08/single.png- (one check) message successfully delivered to the server.
http://crackberry.com/sites/crackberry.com/files/article_images/2013/08/double.png- (two checks) message successfully delivered to the phone of your chat partner.
Note: this does not indicate that the message was read, just that it was delivered.
Also note that in a group chat you will only see one check mark indicating that the message was successfully delivered to the server.

It's in WhatsApp's FAQ that this is the case, so they're not hiding this lack of funtionality, but from my observations its definitely a BIG misunderstanding among WhatsApp users out there. And to me, the value of the read confirmation is EXTREMELY important. The read confirmation is what makes an IM client a reliable form of communication between individuals.
And thus, I think it's an important message for WhatsApp users to know. It's also another compelling reason why I believe BBM is a better service, and when it does become available on Android and iOS I want to see all my WhatsApp' using friends, colleagues and family members on Android and iOS switch to BBM immediately.
Spread the word.


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Tuesday, March 11, 2014

How to keep your PC secure when Microsoft ends Windows XP support

The Windows XPocalypse is almost upon us. After a legendary dozen year run, Microsoft will stop providing security patches for Windows XP on April 8, 2014. Without Microsoft’s protection, all those WinXP PCs will have targets painted on their hard drives.
Nearly 30 percent of Internet-connected PCs still run Windows XP, and no, they won’t die that day. They’ll continue running like normal, but they’ll be rotting inside, becoming increasingly full of security holes. Microsoft itself has dubbed the condition “Zero day forever.”
Look, let’s be honest. You should upgrade from Windows XP right now if at all possible—but not everyone can cut the XP cord so completely. If you can’t upgrade, there are some things you can do to protect yourself. Make no mistake: These tricks are like sticking your finger in a leaking dam. They’ll help a bit, but the dam is crumbling and it’s time to get out of the way.

Understand the risks

When Microsoft says it’s ending support for Windows XP, that means it will no longer produce security patches for critical vulnerabilities in the operating system. As time goes on, more and more critical security holes will be found, and attackers will have free reign to exploit them. Large organizations can pay exorbitant fees for continued custom Windows XP support, but those updates will never trickle out to everyday users or small businesses.
Smart attackers are likely waiting to exploit holes they already know about. They’ll unleash their attacks when Microsoft has moved on. The problems will never be fixed, so they can continue to attack them until the last Windows XP system vanishes from the Internet.
Other software developers will eventually stop supporting Windows XP, just as they no longer support Windows 98, creating even more attack vectors. This won’t happen overnight, but Windows XP will gradually be abandoned by everyone.

Choose your software wisely

If you use Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, it’s time to let go. Internet Explorer 8, the most recent version available for Windows XP, is already several generations old and will no longer receive security patches. Google Chrome will continue supporting Windows XPuntil at least April 2015, while Mozilla Firefox has no announced plans to stop supporting Windows XP. So switch to Chrome or Firefox and you’ll have a secure, modern browser.
Most antivirus solutions will still continue supporting Windows XP. Even Microsoft’s own Microsoft Security Essentials will support Windows XP until July 14, 2015. Antivirus-testing company AV-TEST asked 30 different antivirus companies about their plans for Windows XP support and all of them committed to support Windows XP until at least April 8, 2015. Most committed to supporting it for even longer, into at least 2016.
Be sure you’re using an antivirus program that’s actually receiving updates, though, because that expired copy of Norton isn’t going to help you. An antivirus app isn’t a foolproof solution, and Microsoft warns, “Our research shows that the effectiveness of anti-malware solutions on out-of-support operating systems is limited.” Still, having some type of third-party protection certainly won’t hurt.


If you’re still using the now-defunct Outlook Express, you should stop using it right now. If you really love the Outlook experience, switch to the full version of Outlook included in Microsoft Office. Mozilla is still supporting Mozilla Thunderbird with security patches, though it’s unclear how long they’ll support Thunderbird on older operating system. Of course, you can always just use a web-based email service in Chrome or Firefox.
Microsoft will also stop supporting Office 2003 on April 8, 2014. If you’re still using Office 2003—or, even worse, Office XP— you should update to a newer, supported version of Office for improved security. Yes, this means only ribbon-ified versions of Office will be supported. Sorry.

Remove insecure software

The Java browser plug-in is extremely exploit-prone on any operating system. Unless you really need Java for a specific purpose, you should uninstall it. If you do need it, be sure to disable the browser plug-in and keep it up-to-date.
Other browser plug-ins are also frequently targeted by attackers. Adobe Flash and Adobe Reader are particularly crucial, so keep them up-to-date. Modern versions update themselves automatically, but older versions didn’t even check for updates. If you don’t need these applications, you should probably uninstall them to lock down your XP system as much as possible.
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